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is it? >> guest: where is the ranch? it's on the arizona-new mexico border. the ranch was half in each state, along the gila river--to the south side of the gila river and to the top of the peloncillo mountain range. it's a high desert area. it's rather arid and sparse. there are some oak trees and mesquite trees on the higher elevations. and it's high desert; it's about 5,000 feet high, even on the flat part. but it's--it has a fairly decent climate: rarely gets below freezing in the winter; it gets fairly hot in the summer, but not unbearably so. c-span: how long did you live on that ranch? >> guest: well, i live on it from childhood until i went away to school and eventually got married. my brother, who wrote it with me, lived on it always, until it was sold. and my father ran it until his death--lived on it. and it was started in 1880 by his father. so it had been in the family 113 years by the time it was sold. c-span: how big was it? >> guest: it was very large. it was close to 300 square miles. that's a large area. but, of course, you have to realize that grass is very sparse in
from fort leavenworth in kansas to new mexico, conquering new mexico to california. that happens about the same time. neither of these tremendously to restrain what polk wants, which is peace and the securing of california and texas into the american union. mexico refuses to surrender despite the fact trees of both taylor and carney. the poked pope is jesus and winfield scott to invade central mexico. he bombards veracruz and travels through central mexico securing the capital of the fall of 1847. now in the eyes of americans, it was sort of a foregone conclusion that there sideway because most u.s. citizens harbored a host of racist police of mexican men. foremost among them being mexican men were too lazy and cowardly to fight. in point of fact, mexican troops but very hard as you can see in this print, mexico produces few images of the were so it's great when you find them so you can get a sense of how their envisioning this happening. mexico lost all of these battles and ultimately lost the military side of the war because they had vastly inferior weapons. their leadership was terr
narrative that export help people in the united states in new mexico, hellebore impacted them and their families abraham lincoln makes his first major political speech that i found to be quite widely documented in disgust in newspapers. it's condemning the war. the first political stance on the national stage is actually against the u.s. mexico or. another person i talked about is john j. horgan who saw of you may be familiar with, part of a very important family in jacksonville. and for a time he was leading with politician in the state of illinois. this is hard instead that the u.s.-mexico war that have made lincoln's path forward possible because he was under the shadow of john harden before that happened. "italian little bit about the war. the north american invasion began when president james k. polk sent troops into a disputed area between the new lenses and rio grande rivers with the intention of starting a war he wanted war. he was sent on this -- declaring war. the day before he found out that mexicans have crossed the rio grande and killed 14 soldiers in this dispute
through new mexico, all the way to california. and unfortunately, neither of these tremendous victories bring what polk wants, which is peace in the securing of california and texas into the union. mexico refuses to surrender, despite the victories. so polk decides to invade central mexico. and he bombards veracruz and travel throughcentral mexico, securing the capital in the fall of 1847. in the eyes of americans, it was sort of a poor pollution that their side would win. and win easily. most u.s. citizens harbored racist beliefs about mexican man. foremost being that they were cowardly to fight. in fact, mexican troops fought hard come, as you can see in this rare print. you can actually get a sense of what their rendition wasn't what was happening. mexico lost all of these battles and ultimately lost the military side of the board because they had interior weapons and their leadership was terrible. mexico's government was internal. they were broke. there were various battles where there were no money. the army was supporting itself. because hostile american tribes in new mexico had s
principles of good government: liberty, people and politics." it's written by former new mexico governor gary johnson, and he is also the libertarian party nominee for president in 2012. governor johnson, when and why did you leave the republican party and become a libertarian? >> guest: well, you know, i've probably been a libertarian my entire life, so this is kind of coming out of the closet. [laughter] and i don't think i'm unlike most americans. i think there are a hot more americans in this country that declare themselves libertarian as opposed to voting libertarian. so, you know, the pitch that i'm trying to make right now is vote libertarian with me just this one time. give me a shot at changing things. and if it doesn't work out, you can always return toty, and i'm going to argue that that's what we have right now. >> host: what are those seven principles of good government that you write about? >> guest: well, one is being reality-based, just find out what's what, base your decisions on that, make sure everybody that knows, that should know what you doing knows what you're doing, so
, indeed, and the official state nickname of new mexico is land of enchantment, carrying a whiff of new aged mysticism with it and makes it glowy and warm and fuzzy and tends to obscure a much more complicated reality, and, ultimately, that's what desert american's about, how we imagine the desert or how it's imagined for us by the many arctic tis representations that -- artistic representations that created a vision of the desert for us that's consumed, bought, and sold, the stage upon real estate being sold and hotels and stays in hotels, and tourist packages, ect., and how complicated the actual human geography of the place is. there's imagined place and there's the lived place. i'm going to take you to northern new mexico briefly here. angela chose northern new mexico. she's from central new mexico, and both of the families have issues with addiction, and that was another point of end counter between us. she chose northern knack, i -- northern new mexico, i think, not to be right next door to her family, but close enough to visit often, and, also, because northern new mexico, there'
, the south value -- new mexico, from the south valley. we lived in new mexico together while she did research on addiction for her research paper. we have stapp ford people remitting here -- we have stanford people representing here tonight. [laughter] i followed her on to another land scape, northern new mexico, which i'd already seen. i had been there a couple times as a tourist when i was younger, but we've seen new mexico remitted arian tis -- artistically whether it's a
't visited us got a chapter about the development of the atom bomb and a lot of that took place in new mexico and in particular was very exciting true story of espionage down in new mexico. santa fe apparently is crawling with fbi agents. everybody knew because they were all wearing tweed jackets. but anyway, there is some serious s. ganache going on, so that's great drama for me. so i just like to walk around the streets. i find that very helpful. >> i wondered when i came to the mirrors entry materials and buffalo issue actually went to buffalo. >> i went a couple of times to buffalo. the other thing is buffalo features than 100 years ago was a very different place from what it's like today. nevertheless i went there in the round, but i got a hold of old maps and the buffalo bluebook, which was the list of high society in town and at newspapers published at the time and so on. go in and walking around is never enough. >> give you a feel for the place. >> and doing research is one thing if it's your own research, but are you able to do all of your own research and a book like this? >> i have
in new mexico. he writes for for "the new york times" and the interesting thing is he never heard how angry the president was so there were no repercussions to his career so that was his five minutes of fame. >> he is likely -- lucky because -- moving to alaska. [laughter] >> one of the things that i hate most about this duty is having to call a hault to the proceedings, but i have to. and and i hope we have given you enough to realize that those the book and the cds inside are goldmines. please enjoy them and thank you very much for coming. [applause] >> "500 days" and the author is kurt eichenwald. he joins us here at the national press club. mr. eichenwald what are the 500 days you referred to? >> well this is a book about the period of time between 9/11 and the beginning of the iraq war. the reason i am covering that is, this is the period when all the major decisions were made in terms of policy -- international policy around the world, about how the west was going to respond to al qaeda and the 9/11 attacks. >> so when it comes to president bush, vice president cheney, how proac
, in fact, there's a museum in new mexico i'm told, i think i mention it in the book, i forget, where they have one of these bombs. something about the museum of the nuclear age or something like that in new mexico where they have one of these. obviously, everything out of it, it's just the outside. the four bombs came down with their parachutes. one of them we couldn't find for several months. there was a spanish fisherman francisco port, probably from, i think he came from the next down down, a fishermen's town. the town grew tomatoes. that's basically what they did. this guy, paco, called him paco the bomb guy, he kept saying i know exactly where the fourth bomb is. the u.s. navy didn't listen to him. they had 20 ships there by this time. they were checking the bottom of 120 square miles of the mediterranean. ten by 12 miles, and they couldn't locate the bomb. he said, i know exactly where it is. they didn't want to listen to him. what does he know? a guy who goes out fishing every day knows exactly where he is like you know you are sitting in your seat, and i know i'm standing up
westward supported by the slave holding south and to invade the new mexico territory. there were many other parts of the crisis with or not the last would be free. in 1850 the south was mother eternized, southern nationalism was at the peak. jefferson davis in 1850 said if the southern confederacy was to be formed now it was ready to accept the presidency of its. the north on the other hand was nowhere near ready to go to war and indeed still dominated by the conservative wing of the democratic party allowed largely with the south and in other words the norm wouldn't have fought the war matt or the same war and secession would have succeeded and the consequences of that not only for the american history but for the rest of the world would have been quite tragic. >> what was the floor of congress like in 1850? status tunnell to this, chaotic, intense. aid debate in congress was like the world series today. which there was no sports culture in the mid 19th century. politics was the great american sport. americans came from all over the country to attend the debate especially when the titans l
in northern new mexico has the highest rate of heroin addiction and death from overdose of heroin of anywhere in the country. and has for a long time. and the problem is not getting better, it's getting worse. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> the white house was very controversial as most things in america were. it was not particularly awe-inspiring. neither large, nor awe-inspiring. but the answer the congressman gave said the purpose, if it were larger and more elegant, perhaps some president would be inclined to become its permanent resident. >> vicki goldberg has gathered a few of her favorite white house photos. watch tonight at 7:30 eastern and pacific on c-span3's american history the. tv. >> next, william silver and former federal reserve chairman paul volcker talk about mr. volcker's life and years of government service. it's about an hour and a half. [applause] >> that was very nice. you didn't tell me there were so many people here. so i have a sneaky suspicion that you're not here just to listen to me, so i'm going to be very brief, 13 minutes on a
, and several weeks ago, covenant house in philadelphia led a coalition that successfully championed new safe harbor legislation that helped victims of sex trafficking, and that would be true throughout the united states, and worse in latin america, working in mexico, guatemala, and honduras, we work directly including co-prosecuting the cases against the gangs and cartels trafficking kids who are as young as six, seven, eight, nine, ten years old. the work we do to help vick -- victims recover depends where the victim is on their exploitation and suffering but involves councilling, dealing with rape and exploitation, and develop a plan forward that's not very different than the work that we were doing, you know, 30 years ago. we call it trafficking now, but it's been going on for a long time. kids have been getting bought and sold in this country for a long time, and we worked for a long time helping kids move from exploitation to hope and opportunity. >> another thing we advocate for is for the resources to be better educate the for when someone is actually a victim and someone is there on
that successfully championed new safe harbor legislation that helps victims of sex trafficking. that would be true throughout the united states and of course in latin america where covenant houseworks in mexico, nicaragua and guatemala. in honduras we work very directly including we coprosecute cases against gangs and cartels trafficking kids as young as 6, 7, 8, programs. the work we do to help victims recover depends where that victim is in terms of their exploitation and their suffering. but it almost always involves psychiatric counseling. helping young people begin to deal with rape and exploitation. and help them build a plan forward. that is not very different than the work that we were doing, 30 years ago when kids, we call it trafficking now but it's been going on for a long time. kids have been getting bought and sold in this country for a long time and we've been working helping kids move from exploitation to hope and opportunity. >> another thing we've been advocating for the police forces to be better educated as to when somebody is actually a victim of trafficking and when someone is
begun in charleston but it would have begun in santa fe, new mexico. why? because texas was its own imperial ambitions, westward supported by the slaveholding south, aimed to invade the new mexico territory. there were many other parts to the crisis. fundamentally in this was not the west would be slaves or free. in 1850, the south was military i, other nationalism was at a peak. jefferson davis on the floor of the senate in 1850 said if they southern confederacy was to be formed now, he was ready to accept the presidency of the, in 1850. the north on the other hand was nowhere near ready to go to war. and, indeed, the north still dominated by the conservative wing of the democratic party, largely with the south, in other words, the north would not have fought the war, or certainly would not thought the same or, secession probably would have succeeded. and the consequences of that, not only for american history but for the rest of the world, could've been quite tragic. >> what was the floor of congress like in 1850? >> it was tumultuous, chaotic, intense. a debate in congress was li
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15